Jesus Is Leo the Lion King

October 20, 2014 admin 0

Jesus Is Leo the Lion King By Timothy Spearman I cast a Natal Chart for Jesus (Esu Immanuel) for August 8, 8 BC. Sacred Numerology 888. That’s right, it seems Read More

Titanic Mass Murder Plot

October 19, 2014 admin 0

Titanic Mass Murder Plot There were a total of fifty-five cancellations before she set sail, somewhat reminiscent of the rumors surrounding 9/11 alleging that several people failed to show up Read More

The Pharmaceuticals Are Doctoring the Medicine

October 19, 2014 admin 0

               The Pharmaceuticals Are Doctoring the Medicine                      By Timothy Spearman Four centuries ago, Francis Bacon invented modern empirical science, which depended on five-sense reasoning to prove a scientific proposition Read More

Gandhi: Illuminati Agent & Deception through Subterfuge

October 18, 2014 admin 0

Gandhi: Illuminati Agent Deception through Subterfuge By Timothy Spearman The best person to bring on side in any political cause is a man of God or holy man. Nothing grants greater credibility to a cause than a man of God who swears by God to be a vessel of the truth and a proponent of righteousness. In the case of a Christian community, the mere sight of a collar, cross, ministerial garb and other accoutrements of the Christian leader inspire a certain reverence among his flock and a feeling of awe mixed with unease or even fear. The Satragraya movement would definitely have benefited from such an influential religious figure and certainly would have wished to recruit one to the cause. Reverend J.J. Doke, missionary and opportunistic converter of the multitudes would have jumped at the chance to serve a popular movement of the masses such as Satragraya. He would have equally wished to convert a figure like Mahatma Gandhi to his religion in order to initiate mass conversions under the leadership of a human rights proponent he would single-handedly portray as a saint in his own Gandhi biography. Gandhi never did convert to Christianity as Reverend Doke, the consummate religious opportunist, had hoped, but he did function, as Doke had wished, as a Christian paradigm of Doke’s own invention, a modern day saint who would give Christianity the hormone injection it required. In essence, Doke was a kind of Pygmalion who had fashioned a saint in his own image. Gandhi was an invention who would convince the Christian world that the miracle of Christ really had been possible. If the miracles of healing the lame and feeding the multitudes could be recapitulated in the form of a modern day miracle, people’s faith in Christ would be restored and the churches would be filled once more. Gandhi couldn’t walk on water, heal the lame and blind, or turn water into wine, but what the Satragraya movement would prove through the public relations campaign orchestrated by Doke is that he was capable of performing a modern day miracle: Defeating an imperialist power through passive resistance. The Satragraya movement would have with equal fervor wished to bring a man of God into its fold who would give its cause the legitimacy it sought, a man of the cloth whose reputation would precede him and with sufficient power to convince the masses that, his word being as good as gold, the movement for which he stood really was legitimate. Doke’s letter to The Transvaal Leader on the “Immigrants Restriction Act” and “peace preservation permits” shows how politically savvy he actually is. The language he employs in his letter to the editor is calculating and manipulative. It is intended to elicit shame in the white rulers of South Africa by highlighting how reasonable the Asiatics and their demands really are. A certain degree of irony can be detected sufficient to inflict the appropriate sting. What in essence Doke implies in the letter is that the Asiatics are not protesting laws that violate their basic human rights, but only the practice of leaving the decision in the hands of officials subject to racial bias and questionable ethics. The letter implies that the Asiatics wish their cases to be referred to legitimate courts and that they be granted the right of appeal. The irony of course is that, if the Asiatics were actually to be given such entitlements, it would be tantamount to granting them the very human rights they see themselves as being denied. The strategy employed in Doke’s letter is admirably sophisticated, but not entirely genuine in import by being so: The Asiatics claim simply the interpretation and protection of the Supreme Court. They do not resent the “Immigration Restriction Act”. They only claim that it be notinterpreted by any official, however exalted he may be, but by the recognized Court, and by that judgement they will stand. They do not resent the rejection of Asiatics by Mr. Chamney, and their deportation, but but they claim that no official shall be made supreme. They ask for the right of appeal in such cases to the well-balanced judgement of a properly constituted tribunal. (Rev. J.J. Doke’s Letter to “The Transvaal Leader”, July 4, 1908, p. 495, Appendix III in Vol. 8) What the letter shows is that, while a man of the cloth, Doke is a political animal. His use of language is highly manipulative and far from genuine. Granted, the cause is just, but the language employed is conceived in the spirit of the ends justifying the means. He is not being entirely genuine. This in itself is no fault. The point we are making is that he is politically savvy and a master propagandist. He is also given to employing language in a manipulative and even coercive fashion. We present this as evidence that he is capable of being manipulative or even lying to get what he wants. From a means-ends standpoint this can be justified if the cause is just. This we do not dispute. We simply wish to show that there is no reason for believing that this man of the cloth is above lying. There is a tendency for scholars and the reading public to be persuaded that the good reverend’s biography of Gandhi is entirely genuine and aboveboard because it is written by a man of the cloth, but we intend to show that it is not written to be a genuine account at all, but rather as ‘an experiment with the truth’ to use Gandhi’s own language. Experimenting with the truth in essence is to experiment with a lie, since to employ disparate versions of the truth in order to witness their effect is tantamount to telling lies to observe their effect. Hitler’s maxim that the bigger the lie the more people will believe it is apropos in the case of Gandhi and that of Doke, the master manipulator. There is another question to examine in relation to Doke’s Gandhi biography. Is it professional for a biographer to establish a friendship with his subject? Additionally, is it appropriate from the standpoint of professional ethics to associate oneself with the political movement of the biographical subject? Is it acceptable for a professional biographer to be part of the same political struggle as the biographical subject? Is there a conflict of interests in writing a biography on a subject with whom you are both a friend and a professional colleague? There are such instances of course, but is it ethical from a professional standpoint? One of the authors of this book knows of a case in which a chancellor of a Korean university commissioned a famous Indian diplomat and intimate acquaintance of his to write a biography on him. The Korean university chancellor it turns out was a political opportunist, who built a U.N. sponsored graduate institute of peace studies on land he had appropriated from local villagers, who ended up being displaced and in poverty at the price of his fame. Currying favor with the U.N. and American elite, he was maneuvering into position for a Nobel Peace Prize. If he wins, he will be in the good company of other corrupt laureates such as Henry Kissinger and Kim Dae Jung. Thankfully, the Indian diplomat eventually declined the offer to write a biography on the chancellor. He apparently regarded the biography as one too many conflicts of interest on the part of the chancellor. Doke’s biography M.K. Gandhi: The Story of an Indian Patriot in South Africa is dated 1909, yet it can be established from the evidence of several letters written in the year 1908 that an intimate friendship and political alliance had been forged between Gandhi and Doke well in advance of the biography’s publication. The following letter by Gandhi to Rev. Doke dated Oct. 8, 1908 is a fine example: Dear Mr. Doke,I received your note at Phoenix. The expected has happened. I think it is well. I have arrived just in time. There were serious differences between two sections here. They are by no means over yet. You will say I have accepted the hospitality before the ‘settings’ were finished. I think it was better that I should do that than that the invitation should be Read More